Technology

Explained | Pegasus, the spyware that came in via WhatsApp

Explained | Pegasus, the spyware that came in via WhatsApp

Technology
updates from : the Hindu How does Pegasus come into your phone, and how safe are you? In May 2019, WhatsApp identified that a bug in the app’s call function was used to install a malicious code into users’ phones. On October 29, it identified the malicious code as Pegasus, a spyware developed by an Israeli company, NSO. WhatsApp and its parent company Facebook have sued NSO in a U.S. court. How does Pegasus come into your phone? The code is transmitted by calling the target phone on WhatsApp. The code enters the phone even if the call is not answered. According to some reports, the log of that call gets erased. According to The Citizen’s Lab of the University of Toronto, which worked with WhatsApp on identifying spyware victims, this is only one of the ways of delivering Pegasus.
Squeezed by US embargo, Huawei has built its own operating system. Will its strategy work?

Squeezed by US embargo, Huawei has built its own operating system. Will its strategy work?

Technology
Updates from :  the scroll.in The technology behind the new OS certainly looks promising. But it’s no magic solution to the trade ban. Huawei’s meteoric rise in the telecoms business was brought to a dramatic halt in April when the US government put a ban on US companies doing business with the Chinese firm. This includes Google and crucially for Huawei’s smartphone users, access to the Android operating system updates. Under pressure to come up with a solution, Huawei announced a new, lean operating system, Harmony OS, to the world on August 9. Similar to Android, Huawei’s new operating system can easily work across multiple device types, from TVs to smartphones. The technology behind the OS certainly looks promising. The launch presentation included some staggering benchmar
PSLV-C45 successfully injects EMISAT into orbit: ISRO

PSLV-C45 successfully injects EMISAT into orbit: ISRO

Technology
Updates from :  the Hindu : The EMISAT satellite is aimed at electromagnetic measurement. Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) launched the country's newest satellite, EMISAT, from Sriharikota launch station on Monday. The spacecraft meant to provide electronic intelligence to the Armed Forces is the first of its kind for the country. It took off on the four-stage PSLV-C45 rocket at 9.27 a.m. along with 28 small commercial satellites from the second launch pad at the spaceport of Sriharikota. EMISAT was released first 17 minutes into the launch at an orbit 749 km away. The small satellites were to be released after about 40 minutes at a lower orbit of 504 km. The countdown for the project began on Sunday on board Indian Space Research Organisation’s third generation
Power in space: on Mission Shakti

Power in space: on Mission Shakti

Technology
Updates from :  the Hindu : Mission Shakti might have had one message for India, and another for the world India has entered an elite space club with the Defence Research and Development Organisation blowing up a satellite in a Low Earth Orbit into smithereens. Such Indian capability to take out moving objects has never really been in doubt: the DRDO announced it as early as in 2011. Indeed, India has been in the business of testing long-range missiles for years, although public attention on the space programme has been mostly on its civilian and scientific aspects. The military dimension, though always latent, had not seen a verifiable demonstration as in the case of Mission Shakti, the Anti-Satellite (ASAT) missile test. The display of technological prowess through the test accentu
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